• S.

    PROF. DR. FREUD

    WIEN IX., BERGGASSE 19

    Jany 7th 1923

    Dear Brill

    Now as I hear your name so often men-
    tioned by Dr Asch, I will not go far into
    the new year without reopening our
    correspondence. Especially as I may suspect
    that there is something wrong between
    us again. In your last letter (I think)
    you spoke of , £ 40 you had to send me
    and I felt uncanny as soon as I read it,
    knowing your complex and regretting
    that my last acceptance of # 500 had
    not quieted you down.

    I fact I am pretty well off and there is
    no prospect of my practice decreasing as long
    as I can work.

    I am still dissatisfied by you, having to
    treat you as a naughty beloved child.
    You did not appear at the Congress, where
    your presence was highly desirable. When
    I saw █████ I learned that you
    had attempted to treat a case of such
    severity, on the limit of curability, by
    giving her half hours; I know from
    different quarters that you have given
    up the lying position of the patient
    on account of the prudish resistance
    of American ladies; your contributions
    to the Journal were very scanty in fact
    etc and on the whole I think you
    have submitted far too much to the
    two big vices of America, the greed
    for money and the respect of public
    opinion. There is none else to tell you
    so than myself and I think I acquire
    the right to do so by my affection for you.

  • S.

    I heard from █████ your criticism that I was [...]
    wrong by in designing Frink to become the
    leader of your group, as leaders are not
    nominated but grow’ out of the situation
    and their powers. But mark, my boy
    I never nominated him, in fact I have
    no claim and no influence for such an
    interference; all I did was to beg you
    to assist him, not to prevent him, if he tried
    to raise himself to such a position. As your
    personal ambitions seems to be satisfied enough
    and you had met with strong obstacles
    yourself. My personal esteem of Frink is
    largely based on his challenging public
    opinion and [not] being afraid of the famous
    „scandal“. He is an excellent fellow besides
    and I would be glad if you got into very
    intimate connection between each other.
    He I had a wire from him after his marriage
    in Paris, they may now be in Egypt.

    Our friend Asch is a remarkably nice
    and kind man, but a tough case for ana-
    lysis. He has no analytic attitude at all,
    lives in the clouds, finds all possible
    faults with me, forgetfulness, an inclination
    to fall asleep during analysis, a tendency
    to slighten him compared to others and
    cannot be brought to see what all this means.
    Yet I do not despair of his success, he is no
    Oberndorf, it will only take a lot of
    time. Keep my judgment to yourself.

    And now with my best, kindest wishes
    for you and your family to work
    last all the year through

    I am affectionately
    Yours
    Freud